A Solid Foundation For Your Private Pay Private Practice

Being in private practice, you probably find yourself too often worrying about where your next client will come from.  The whole process of getting enough clients seems random and out of control.  And when you decide to focus on finding more private pay clients, the thought of filling your book seems even more scary and overwhelming. You know they’re out there, but you just don’t know where to look or how to start getting those private-pay clients through the door. In general, if you want to get clients, you’ve got to get noticed.  People need to know why you are the best option for them.  All of your marketing must answer the BIG question – “Why, given all of my choices (including doing nothing at all), should I do business with YOU?” The message you send in your marketing will be much more efficient and effective when you are “rock solid” about 3 critical things. Who you are, and what you do. When people ask what you do, don’t answer with your job title or description.  Be prepared to give them the information they need, to know if you are for them.  Tell them whom you serve and what BIG result people get when they work with you. Here is an example:  “I help people with panic disorder take their lives back from their anxiety so they can live their best lives”.  People who hear this from you immediately know if you are what they need Why you do it. You can reinforce and clarify your message by letting people know what you stand for, and why you get up in...

> AMHCA, ACES and NBCC Jointly Endorse Plan for Licensure Portability

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – The American Mental Health Counselors Association (AMHCA), the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES), and the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC) have jointly endorsed a plan for counselor licensure portability. This plan from leading counselor organizations establishes a regulatory platform allowing licensed counselors to move between and practice in multiple states. The AMHCA-ACES-NBCC portability plan is built on sound principles of quality assurance and national standards. The plan will promote acceptance of a license from another state when the individual holds a degree from a clinically focused counselor preparation program accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling & Related Educational Programs (CACREP), holds certification as a National Certified Counselor, or meets standards adopted by the state board of counseling. Dr. Keith Mobley, president of AMHCA, states: “The AMHCA leadership commends the efforts of NBCC and ACES for collaborating on this agreement, as it demonstrates strides toward professional unification and portability of licensure. It has been the long-standing goal of AMHCA to seek consistently high standards among credentials for clinical mental health counselors so that our profession may benefit by achieving status equivalent to other practitioners in federally funded programs and gain license portability among states.” The sentiments are echoed by ACES President Dr. Tarrell Portman, who says: “the counseling profession has too long suffered from inconsistency in education and training standards. These varying requirements have hampered the growth of the profession and the ability of counselors to move across state lines. ACES is excited to be part of this strategic partnership to establish a national education and training standard for licensure portability.” “This...

> Modification of TRICARE Independent Practice Standards Advanced

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: MAY 18, 2015 Contact: Jim Finley 800-326-2642 jfinley@amhca.org www.amhca.org Modification of TRICARE Independent Practice Standards Advanced ALEXANDRIA, Va. – On May 15, 2015 the full House approved House Armed Services Committee legislation that included a provision sought by the American Counseling Association (ACA) to modify the TRICARE August 18, 2014 rule for Certified Mental Health Counselors. Under HR. 1735, “The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016” (NDAA), the extension of full independent practitioners status for CMHCs under TRICARE would be temporarily broadened to include more practitioners from many different training programs. This new language is now part of the House version of the NDAA and will ultimately be considered by the Senate. The Senate version, S. 1118, currently does not include the House language, but they are expected to soon consider their own NDAA bill. The comprehensive annual funding bill sets the spending policy and rules for the nation’s armed forces.ACA sought the change without input from other stakeholders such as AMHCA, NBCC, CACREP, or the MFTs. Consequently, at this time these other stakeholders are unresolved about taking further action on the provision as it merely postpones the full implementation of the TRICARE 2014 rules until 2027, when the 2014 standards would be restored. As policy, it provides much more time for recent and future CMHC graduates from non-CACREP programs to participate independently under TRICARE. However, even with the delay, CMHC training programs will still need to transition quickly to CACREP to ensure graduates can participate in programs operated by the Department of Veterans Affairs and receive professional training funds administered by the Department...

> 6 Tips For Establishing A Private Practice

Starting a private practice can be the most exciting, yet most intimidating, step you will take in your career. It helps to have some guidance along the way, and it is critical to get the support you need while making this fabulous leap of faith. Here are a few tips to get you going, and keep you going. #1: Stop putting it off until you are ‘ready’ Once you decide owning your own private practice is what you want, it’s important to be prepared for taking the leap into private practice. Few of us ever really feel ready, but that’s to be expected. Those butterflies in your stomach will keep you on your game; they will keep you excited and wide-eyed. Being excited about your work can help you to become incredibly successful. If you are working for someone else, probably 50 percent to 75 percent of the revenue you generate is left on the table for your employer. You do the math—how much money is it costing you each month that you put off establishing your own private practice? The golden handcuffs of traditional employment (predictable income, benefits, guaranteed clients) can be very comforting for some, but are quite costly for those who want to own their own business. #2: Make it your ‘dream’ practice, right from the start Now that you’ve taken the leap, be sure you customize your practice. Take the time to dream. Where do you want to work? What will your office look like? Which days will you work? How many hours a day will you work? What types of clients will you see?...